Tree Survey

  • Tree Survey,  Walks

    November Tree Surveys

    Hi to all Tree Surveyors! 20/11 Update: We are nearing completion of the tree survey but there are loads of gaps and dodgy identifications that we need to revisit especially with some of the conifers. In the new year it may be a good idea to have another get together e.g. at Kings Heath Park House and look at our results – what do you think? Last week we recorded some interesting varieties of the native holly Ilex aquifolium. Round shaped or pyramidal, without prickles, with narrow or wide leaves and often with peculiar pimples on the bark (see pic attached). Slightly distracted by a rabbit being taken for a…

  • Imagery,  Nature,  Tree Survey

    Tree survey and Conifer Workshop – successful days

      Hi All, The conifer workshop on 8th April was a great success and Martin Collins took us round Kings Heath Park and in the light of the setting sun we collected specimens of pine, fir, cypress etc – looked for cones, sniffed the leaves and became aware of how much there is to learn about conifers. Then an intensive perusal of the twigs in the lab, with cakes and drinks to hone our identification skills. Many thanks Martin, for a most enjoyable and informative session. The tree survey on 26th April covered old hedgerows in Area 1, near to the car park. We found oaks, sycamore, ash and multistemmed…

  • Tree Survey

    Tree Survey, 5 April

    Hi All, On Saturday April 5th we recorded by the ancient Hedgerow and along the railway line in Area 1, where bramble contrived to trip us up at every turn. We found a woodpecker feast of a standing dead stump surrounded by high brambles, sycamores, beeches, hybrid black poplars, a lime and a False Acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia, aka Black Locust). Peter told us that the wood from this member of the pea family is so hard that it was used for making nails. Bluebells and cow parsley thrive in this little woodland area and we also spotted masses of pignut. On the way, we stopped by the hollow ash to…

  • Tree Survey

    March 1 Tree Survey

    On Saturday we surveyed the Beech Copse in Area 4. John and Diana have counted 42 trees there and we mapped out the larger ones – mostly beech but also oak, horse chestnut and poplar. One tree had extensive graffiti carved into the bark. It looked like the incomprehensible ramblings of someones notebook in 1984. There was also a tree marked 1884. Quite a bit of tree hugging went on after Diana gave us the following information which relates to ancient trees of each species: Woodland Trust Info: An adult hug + 1.5 metres Ancient Trees: Oak-3 hugs Beech-2 Scots Pine-2 Rowan-1 Birch-1 Hawthorn-1 Cedar of Lebanon-4 Field Maple-1 Sweet…

  • Tree Survey

    Tree Survey Gadget

    Next Saturday at the Tree Planting we want to show people what the tree survey is about, so we’ll be displaying some of the data and doing little demonstrations of tree identification. One of the more challenging parts of surveying a tree is calculating its’ height. There are various ways of doing this ranging from finger estimates to fancy gadgets. The typical method involves calculating the vertical side of a right triangle. The easiest of those methods involves sighting a 45 degree line from the ground to the top of a tree. A viewing angle of 45 degrees means that the horizontal distance to the tree base is the same…

  • News,  Tree Survey

    February 3 Tree Survey

    We had a good morning session surveying on Saturday, skipping between 3 areas. This was to include a few trees that might form part of a tree trail linking with the Kings Heath Floral Trail and the Walk 2000 Route. Yes ! We have got the money to do this! So full speed ahead. We noted the fallen Lombardy poplar that has sprouted all along the trunk and has a pool of water in the root hole. Also oaks and horse chestnut next to the path in Area 1 and then a brisk walk to Area 4 where a large standing stump, possibly of ash, appears to have succumbed to…